Trauma Focused Treatment

Trauma is found to be one of the most common co-occurring disorders for people suffering with substance use disorder.

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What is Trauma?

Trauma occurs after experiencing, witnessing, or being threatened with an event or events that involve serious injury, a threat to the physical integrity of one’s self or others, or possible death. The responses to these events include intense fear, helplessness, or horror.

Trauma is a contributing risk factor in developing substance use disorder. Exposure to traumatic experiences can be in the form of sexual, physical, or emotional abuse that is experienced either directly or indirectly.

It is estimated that individuals with a diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) engage in treatment for Substance Use Disorders (SUD) at a rate five times higher than the general population.

Identifying and Treating Different Types of Trauma

Trauma can cause a wide variety of physical and psychological  symptoms. Some people develop an inability to control their anger, while others may develop an anxiety disorder or fall victim to depression. Detachment from one’s emotions is common amongst victims of trauma. Relationship problems, flashbacks, and sleep disturbances are also common symptoms for people who have lived through traumatic events. People suffering from trauma may struggle with substance use disorder, eating disorders, or have a tendency to harm themselves.

Trauma-focused Treatment at Midwest Detox Center involves Co-Occurring Disorder Therapy in an effort to resolve trauma that is an underlying cause of client’s addictions.

There is a range of possible responses to trauma. These include acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

 Acute stress disorder is an immediate response to a traumatic incident. It lasts anywhere from three days to three weeks following an event. People who develop this disorder are at risk of PTSD and may benefit from trauma therapy.

Chronic PTSD lasts for three months or more after experiencing trauma. Delayed-onset PTSD develops at least six months after a traumatic event. Some symptoms may show up earlier but may not be recognized as a response to trauma.

Complex trauma symptoms can develop at any time. They often result from ongoing situations rather than one-time events. Examples include chronic emotional neglect, domestic abuse and attachment issues.

 

Components of Trauma-Focused Treatment

  • Grief or loss counseling

  • Peer support groups

  • Individual or group talk therapy (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy)

  • Exposure or desensitization work

  • Pharmacotherapy: medications to decrease symptoms

  • Holistic practice: mindfulness techniques, relaxation, yoga, meditation, acupuncture

  • Coping skill development: emotional regulation, cognitive restructuring (often gender specific coping skills)Identify

Is Residential Treatment Right For You?

Learn About Our Program Learn More

Get Help Now

An Addiction Specialist Is Available To Discuss Treatment Options That Are Right For You. (833) 440-8647

Verify Your Health Insurance Benefits

Expedite Admission To Our Facility By Verifying Your Insurance Benefits. Verify Now